How a California prison became the tear gas capital of America

This is a photograph of a room where people have died:

(Robert Walsh photo)

It is in a building next to other buildings filled with hallways where bodies have disappeared only to reappear – perforated, lifeless and jammed under bed bunks exactly like this one:

(Robert Walsh photo)

A fence surrounds these buildings. It looks exactly like this:

(Robert Walsh photo)

To stand inside this fence is to stand in the prison where the notorious Mexican Mafia gang first spilled blood in 1957.

To stand inside this fence is to stand where, in the early 1980s, more tear gas was sprayed on inmates annually than in the entire rest of the nation’s prison systems combined.

To stand inside this fence is to stand in the Deuel Vocational Institution (DVI) of Tracy, Calif., or as it used to be known, “The Gladiator School”.

But this story isn’t about DVI.

And it isn’t about pepper sprayed inmates.

It’s about the people paid to do the spraying … More

(Note: Clicking this link will take you to my blog on HuffingtonPost.com, where the rest of this story is stored. ~ Luke)

Posted on by Luke Whyte |

One Response to How a California prison became the tear gas capital of America

  1. Your writing is riveting. Its incomprehensible to me how these young men were treated. Its inhumane. Thank you for all that you are doing to shed light on the injustice of our justice system.

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